High schoolers talking

K-12 Funding & State Budget

Arizona’s economy and future success depends on the degree to which all children have the opportunity to receive quality education, to grow up healthy, and to be safe.

By supporting families and making economic investments that ensure they have access to quality schools, stable and affordable housing, and well-paying jobs, Arizona is investing in its future.

State Tax Payers Are Paying Less Today Than 30 Years Ago

State Revenue per $1,000 of Personal Income

State and Local Taxes Paid Per $100 of Income, by Income Group

Chart showing higher income progressively paying less state and local taxes

Where the General Fund Comes From

($11.8 Billion)

How Arizona's General Fund is Spent

($11.8 Billion)

2021 Priorities

  1. Fund virtual school in the pandemic at the same levels as in-person.
  2. Oppose all new tax cuts, credits and exemptions so that Arizona has the revenue it needs to help Arizonans face the COVID health and economic crisis.
Government building with AZ flag

The Arizona Center for Economic Progress

The Arizona Center for Economic Progress is a leader in advancing policies that create fairer tax codes which raise the revenue needed to invest in education, affordable housing, health care, infrastructure, and other supports needed to build thriving communities and better economic opportunities for all Arizonans.

Learn More

Read the Latest

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Arizona’s legislators missed a unique opportunity this legislative session

Arizona’s legislators had a unique opportunity this legislative session. The pandemic did not result in state revenues falling to the $1 billion deficit that was expected. Instead, analysts projected there was more than $1 billion in ongoing, unobligated revenues plus nearly $3 billion in one-time…

Source: ABC's Schoolhouse Rock
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Good ideas that didn't fit the bill

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Governor Ducey’s proposed budget - The good, the bad and more tax cuts

arizona capitol state of the state
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State of the State

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Arizona's drop in K-12 enrollment could mean lost funding for public schools